“BG MOA<sup>®</sup> saves lawn mower race!”

As a technician, I have used BG products, and loved the results. As a shop owner, I used BG products, and swear by the results. Now, as a racing enthusiast, I will forever stand behind the results. I race lawnmowers (yes, you heard me right) as a hobby, traveling for miles to a track. I have built the chassis and engine as per US Lawn Mower Racing Association (USLMRA) rules and race with a bunch of folks from Kansas.

When I built the engine, this was my first one and knew there might be problems, learning curve and such. So, I did nothing more than bore it .030″ over and make certain clearance modifications, including modifying the stock connecting rods for better oiling. Keep in mind this is a splash-fed, not a pressure-fed engine. In the service manual, there are instructions that tell you to face the oiling hole AWAY from the oil slinger. And since that’s the way I thought I remembered it coming apart, that’s the way it went back in. I have been testing, tuning, and doing some HARD racing with this poor little Briggs engine since then. It wasn’t until the feature race July 14 that I was informed by several people that the service manual was incorrect! That oil hole should face the slinger! So, if it was going to seize up and break a rod, I wanted to do it with style. I put it in 2nd gear and ran the whole race that way. Never missed a beat. I took it home, and stared at the engine, just knowing of the scraping, filings, shavings and overheated crankshaft journal. After two days, I finally opened the inspection cover, unbolted the connecting rod cap – and WOW, not a scratch! Not a burr, no metal anywhere in the engine’s sump. It looks like I just put it together!

In a one-quart sump, I added 5 ounces MOA, and topped off with engine oil. Doesn’t look like I will be changing my ratio!

There is no place to put pictures on here, else I would. I have an older picture that shows the rod in the reversed position, and you would be able to tell by the meta tag. I have two other shots of the bearing cap and upper connection rod bearing surface, and all you can see are the resizing marks from when I had the rods clearanced.

Thanks guys! Your products have saved this engine, and I wanted to brag all about it.

Jeff
Owner
Second Opinion Automotive